Dr. Yosi Shacham

Title: Bio electrochemical sensors: and overview and forecast 

Abstract

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The term bio-electrochemical sensor is used for both electrochemical sensors for biological applications and for sensors that use biological systems; both concepts will be reviewed.  In this tutorial, we will present an overview of electrochemical sensors medical and health care, food, agriculture and environmental applications. We will present a short overview of the first principles used for bio-electrochemical sensors such as the interactions that occur at the solid-electrolyte interface and transport phenomena in the electrolyte.  We will present the state of the art methods and electrode technology and review the use of nano electrodes made of various materials: their highlights and problems We will discuss the issues of specificity and selectivity and the use of surface functionalization to improve the electrode performance. Next, we will be preened the topic of electrochemical whole cell sensors, their modeling and few applications.  A short overview of the important detection methods such as chronoamperometry, voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy will be discussed. We will present the detection methods basic principles as well as the equipment setups for various applications. Finally, we will present a forecast of the application of bio-electrochemical sensors in light of the rapid developments in various fields such as information technologies and system miniaturization using micro and nanotechnolohgies.

Bio

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Prof. Yosi Shacham-Diamand, The Bernard L. Schwartz chair for nano scale information technologies, Department of Electrical Engineering - Physical electronics and the department of Material science and technology, Faculty of engineering, Tel Aviv University. D.Sc. EE 1983, M.Sc. EE 1980, and B.Sc. EE (Summa-cum Laude) 1978, all in the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.  1983-post-doctorate at U.C. Berkeley, CA, USA. 1987- 1989 senior lecturer, the Technion, Israel. 1989-1996 assistant professor Cornell university, Ithaca NY, USA, 1997-2001 Associate professor and since 2001 a full professor at the school of electrical engineering, Physical Electronics department, Tel-Aviv University. Yosi has been also a Visiting professor, CNR-IMM, Rome, Italy, Visiting Professor, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan and a distinguished international chair professor, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan.

He served in few academic position including being the Academic Director, Micro Technologies Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv university (2000 –2001), the director of Tel-Aviv University research institute for Nano-Science and nano-technologies (2001–2004), Head of the department of Physical Electronics, faculty of Engineering (2007- 2011), the Vice-dean of the faculty of engineering for Industrial relations and with the friends of the faculty in Israel and abroad. He was on the university board of governors (2008-2012), University patent committee (2006-2010), head of the industrial affiliation program, Faculty of engineering (2012) and a Member of the board of directors of "RAMOT" by Tel Aviv University (2008-2013). He is a Member of the MAGNET committee promoting basic and generic technologies in Israel, the innovation authority, Ministry of trade and Industry.

He published 227 journal papers, >400 conference papers in registered proceedings, 7 chapters in books, 30 patents, edited two conference proceedings books, and two books. His research is in the field of Micro and Nano electronics science and technology:

1)     Micro and Nano scale Metallization:

  • a)      Electroless plating of metals and alloys,
  • b)      Interconnect technology for ULSI circuits and flexible electronics,
  • c)       Bio electrochemical electrodes.

2)     Electrochemical bio sensors the food, medical and agro applications.

  • a)      Nano particle based sensors
  • b)      Whole cell sensors

F. Levent Degertekin

Title: Integrated Microsystems for Medical Ultrasound Imaging

Abstract

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Ultrasound is the most frequently used medical imaging modality with applications from internal medicine, gynecology to cardiology and intravascular imaging. Most recent developments in this field focus on highly integrated systems for portable imaging probes wirelessly interfaced with cell phones and interventional catheter based devices with on-chip transmit-receive beamforming and multiplexing and take advantage of advances in real-time computing for fast imaging.

This tutorial will first present fundamentals of ultrasound imaging and generic imaging system components such as transducer arrays, analog front end electronics and image formation hardware. We will describe the cutting edge developments in piezoelectric and capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology, monolithic and multi-chip integration approaches that combine high density 2D transducer arrays for real-time 3D imaging and data processing. We will then focus on several microsystems for intravascular and intracardiac imaging where CMUT-on-CMOS technology is used to integrate low power analog front end and different time division multiplexing (TDM) schemes at the catheter tip. Specifically, we will describe a forward-looking volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system and an intracardiac imaging catheter with TDM and direct digital demultiplexing for cable reduction enabling interventions under MRI instead of X-ray guidance. Lastly, a system that can be integrated on a guidewire for IVUS imaging will be described as an ultimately miniaturized imaging system on a chip.

The tutorial will conclude with a discussion of recent work on integrated ultrasound systems from industry and leading academic labs, emerging techniques such as photoacoustic imaging, ultrasound imaging with molecular contrast and challenges ahead for this important imaging modality.

Bio

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F. Levent Degertekin received the B.S. degree in 1989 from the Middle East Technical University, Turkey; the M.S. degree in 1991 from Bilkent University, Turkey; and the Ph.D. degree in 1997 from Stanford University, CA, all in electrical engineering. Currently, he holds the G.W. Woodruff Chair in Mechanical Systems, and is a Professor at the G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, GA. His research interests have been in medical ultrasound imaging, micromachined acoustic and opto-acoustic devices, bioanalytical instrumentation, and atomic force microscopy. He has over 50 U.S. patents and has authored over 100 journal publications.  Dr. Degertekin was an associate editor for the IEEE Sensors Journal and currently serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control. He also serves on the Technical Program Committee of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium and as a charter member of the NIH Biomedical Imaging Technologies (BMIT-A) study section (2016-2020). Dr. Degertekin has received an NSF CAREER award in 2004, and with his students, the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control (UFFC) Society 2004 Outstanding Paper award, and most recently the IEEE UFFC Society 2014 Carl Hellmuth Hertz Ultrasonic Achievement Award.

Maaike Op de Beeck

Title: Development of implantable electronics: issues and trends

Abstract

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Always more electronic devices are widely used in the medical world, from large computer-controlled diagnostic scanners over medium sized electronic equipment to small wearable devices. Due to the miniaturization of electronic chips and the development of MEMS, very small microsystems can be fabricated which offer a strong potential for usage inside the human body. Nevertheless, placing a device inside the human body is much more than making a small device: the interaction of implanted material with the body results in dedicated device requirements. The electronic device needs a dedicated encapsulation functioning as a very performant diffusion barrier, to avoid diffusion of toxic materials from the device into the body, as well as to avoid leaching of body fluids inside the implant. Moreover, the encapsulation itself needs to be biocompatible and biostable, and ideally also soft and flexible to limit the natural ‘foreign body reaction’ of the human organism. Obviously the total device needs to be very reliable and safe, which will be controlled by regulatory authorities (FDA, EMEA,..) to ensure patient safety. While the medical world asks for always smarter implants with more functionality, typically resulting in a bigger device with a larger battery, there is also a strong demand for miniaturization of the implanted devices. To merge these two contradictive requests, smart engineering of implantable electronic devices is essential, combined with design for minimal power consumption, the use of alternative powering options, and the development of novel thin hermetic packaging technologies.

During the tutorial, the topics above will be discussed, to give the audience insight in the issues related with the development of electronic implants, and to indicate new development trends in order to create the electronic implants of the future.

Bio

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Maaike Op de Beeck received her electronic engineering degree and PhD in 1985 and 1992 resp. from the University of Leuven (Belgium). She held several research positions at the University of Leuven (Belgium), at Philips (The Netherlands), at Mitsubishi Electric (Japan), and at imec (Belgium). During the first 20 years of her carrier, Maaike was investigating several IC-CMOS processing technologies, and she specialized in advanced lithography. From 2008 Maaike became active in the field of wearable and implantable microsystems for biomedical applications. In 2009 she became program manager of imec’s HUMAN++program. Since 2012 she joined CMST (an imec laboratory associated with the UGent University), to investigate advanced packaging technologies for various medical microsystems, and in particular to coordinate the research related to the FITEP platform (Flexible Implantable Thin Electronic Package). Since 2016 she is also professor at the University of Ghent, with ‘microsystems for medical applications’, as her research domain.

Maurits Ortmanns

Title: Implantable electronics for highly parallel neural interfaces

Abstract

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Implantable medical devices (IMD) are nowadays widely employed to restore functions to the impaired individuals suffering from diseases like deafness, blindness, cardiac insufficiency,  incontinence, neural disorders, and many more. Such implantable systems become increasingly challenging, if a large number of sensing or stimulating sites needs to be realized - space and power budget, safety issues, high bidirectional data rates, as well as the vast number of electrical interfaces make the electronic circuit design a complex task of research and development. 

This talk will highlight some of the recent worldwide advances towards the realization of high channel count implantable neural interfaces, covering applications and system examples such as the retinal implant and neural modulators with high efficiency frontends, as well as give an overview of the supporting circuitry, such as transcutaneous data telemetry including safety and security aspects, power telemetry, and adaptive power management.

Bio

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Maurits Ortmanns received the Dr.-Ing. from IMTEK, University of Freiburg, Germany in 2004. From 2004-2005 he was with sciworx GmbH, Hannover, Germany as a project leader in mixed-signal electronics. From 2006-2007 he was Assistant Professor for Integrated Interface Circuits at the University of Freiburg, Germany, and since 2008 he is full professor and director of the Institute of Microelectronics at the University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany. His research interests include mixed-signal integrated circuit design, self-correcting and reconfigurable analog circuits, with special emphasis on data converters and biomedical applications. He served as program committee member of ESSCirC, DATE, ECCTD, ICECS, as Associate Editor of IEEE TCAS I and TCAS II, as Guest Editor for IEEE JSSC, and as program and executive committee member of ISSCC. He holds several patents, is coauthor of the book “Continuous-Time Sigma-Delta A/D Conversion”, and published more than 200 IEEE journal and conference papers.